Season 4 Finale Tonight: Does Tyrion live? [Preview]

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Last time we saw them, Arya (Maisie Williams) and The Hound (Rory McCann) were thwarted once again when they got some unexpected news at the Vale. © HBO

It’s going to be hard for HBO to top last week’s “Watcher on the Wall” episode with tonight’s season finale.

As Kit Harrington told Access Hollywood, last week’s Battle at Castle Black was “as big as Thrones has gone” and it was the “most expensive episode that they’ve ever made.” (As I said in the recap, it’s my personal favorite episode ever.) In terms of expense, the CGI to create the giants and the Wall itself helped that cost soar according to showrunners Benioff and Weiss.

In Canada, the Game of Thrones season 4 finale is being broadcast live in Cineplex theaters. The tickets are ten bucks, you get to see the finale on the big screen, you get a $10 concession coupon, and you get to share in the experience with a huge group of people. If I still lived in Canada, I’d do this in a heartbeat. What an amazing idea!

Given the fact that excited fans crashed the HBO Go servers during the season 4 premiere, it will be interesting to see if anything similar happens tonight (that is, if HBO’s  infrastructure is prepared). After all, lots of people wanna know if Tyrion lives or dies.

The synopsis for tonight’s episode, “The Children,” doesn’t tell us much: “Circumstances change after an unexpected arrival from north of the Wall; Dany must face harsh realities; Bran learns more about his destiny; Tyrion sees the truth about his situation.”

Last week Jon Snow left on a suicide mission to try to negotiate with — or kill — Mance Rayder, the Wildling leader. The men at Castle Black can’t hold out much longer against Mance’s massive army. The Crows are lucky they made it through the night.
Dany just parted with Jorah. Are harsh realities in store for her because of it?
The preview shows Bran with a great heart tree (a weirwood tree with a face). The heart tree is a symbol of the faith of the Old Gods, a faith practiced mainly in the North.
The biggest question, however, is what will come of Tyrion? Will he live or will he die?

Here’s the preview:

Jamie Adair is the editor of History Behind Game of Thrones, a website about the history behind George RR Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" novels and the hit TV show, "Game of Thrones."

2 Comments

  • Reply June 15, 2014

    Grant

    The last part of the description for the episode actually got a chuckle out of me.

  • Reply June 16, 2014

    Watcher on the Couch

    As you probably know, the episode is broadcast a day later in the UK than in North America so I won’t be able to make any comments until tomorrow. As “Game of Thrones” continues I wonder if I am seeing similarities to other works (or real history) that WEREN’T there. Years and years ago the BBC showed some of the works of the Russian film director Sergei Eisenstein and I found a version of “Alexander Nevsky” on YouTube recently. It’s terribly dated now of course but there is the epic sweep of a battle on the ice in the film and a feisty warrior maiden Vasilisa, so I wondered if GRRM might have seen the film at some time. But I may be barking up completely the wrong tree.

    Turning to real history, the Stewart or Stuart family became monarchs of Scotland when Walter the Steward married a daughter of Robert the Bruce
    https://www.royal.gov.uk/HistoryoftheMonarchy/Scottish%20Monarchs(400ad-1603)/TheStewarts/TheStewarts.aspx

    This made me think of the Tyrells, because if my recollection of Westerosi lore is correct (and I’ll admit be the first to admit there are so many strands in the story that I sometimes get confused) the ancestors the Tyrells in the show were originally stewards, though they came to prominence by a route different than marrying into the reigning house.

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